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government and the a ring government that had the u.n. security council, not security comes, general assembly, in 1998, at which their rings agree to withdraw the threats. and after that there was a parody, a couple years when the british tried to make sure they were telling the truth and had been telling the truth the but before that there was kind of a step-by-step thing. i mean, i was pushing very hard to be allowed to just do ordinary professional things that writers do, such as -- i came out to be able to talk about, talk to my readers and things like that. all of this was a battle with security forces, internationally. and gradually we got a little more cooperation, and so that got done a little bit. i mean, the thing that really, have to say this, the thing that really make a big difference to in those years was this country. because america allowed me to come here for periods of time, which started off being short, like a week or 10 days, and ended up being much longer, like too much, too and as months at a time, and litter and ordinary free life. [applause] so i was allowed to make m
in government, u.n. poll sicks domestically. how do you weigh in on the ethics of using drone, and then second question, after the killing of bin laden, do you feel al-qaeda is more or less defeated? >> okay. good questions, both. on the subject of drones, i think they are the most significant advance in humanitarian warfare in history. i think that because the three principles of a just war are necessity, determination, and proportionality. necessity meaning are the people you are fighting, do you need to fight them? is there a way to deal with bin laden and other than shooting at them or capturing them? i come down strongly on the side of, no, these are irreconcilable. the next two questions are making sure that you're targeting the right people and that you're striking targets with the level of force required and no more; right? now, think about it, drones give you more than any tool in history the ability to make sure you are hitting the right target. doesn't mean they don't make mistakes, but you have a better chance of reaching that 100% goal with a drone than you do firing a shell or dr
institutions like the un and world bank that they were all designed to be weak, they were all designed to play a secondary role to nations whose sovereignty we saw as inviolable. i don't think that is sustainable because so many of the interests you or i have as individual citizens of wherever we come from are really affected by decisions that happen on a global stage. >> host: david rothkopf is our guest. numbers are on the screen if you'd like to participate in this author:2 your 2-585-3885. in east and central time zones 585-3886. if you live in the mountain and pacific time zones, mr. rothkopf, former managing director of kissinger associates and current ceo of foreign policy. what is foreign policy? >> guest: divisional, washington post foreign policy magazine, the foreign policy website which is not much bigger than the magazine, three million visitors on the web site and runs a series of events and other programs on international issues. >> host: mr. rothkopf, in "power, inc." you have a chapter about a swedish boat. what is that story? >> guest: i wanted to go to the origin story of th
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3